Cool Stuff, Ham Culture, Homebrewing

Nerd Famous

It’s nice to see we hams, who I think suffer from a bit of an image as throwbacks in the larger maker community, get some recognition for the good stuff we’ve accomplished. Today on Hackaday, a nice article about Manhattan and Ugly construction was posted, with ample coverage given to the fact that a lot of the best exemplars of these techniques come from the world of amateur radio builders. I’m not certain about how others feel on this topic, but it seems to me that Hackaday is one of the preeminent blogs relating to our hobby, so I get quite excited when we get repped there.

hackaday.com-2016-05-04-getting-ugly-dead-bugs-and-going-to-manhattan-_2

Featured in this article are two names well-known in our circles, and guys that I’m proud to call my friends (although I have never personally met either in real life yet!). Todd VE7BPO, is renowned for his rigorous empirical work in circuit design, as well as his beautiful Ugly circuit creations. They feature one of his designs near the top of the article.

hackaday.com-2016-05-04-getting-ugly-dead-bugs-and-going-to-manhattan-_105

The other is Dave AA7EE, who is probably familiar to almost every reader, unless you just crawled out from living under a rock for the last decade. It’s not difficult to see why they chose Dave’s work for to illustrate Manhattan construction, as his is some of the best out there. Period. Also unsurprisingly, this is not the first time that Dave’s creations have made it to Hackaday.

Well done, gentlemen! Way to show the maker world at large that we’ve got relevant skills for the 21st century hacker community!

 

Ham Culture, Homebrewing, QRP

Goodbye to QRP Homebuilder

It’s late at night here, but I wanted to write a short post, because this is very notable. I have unfortunately found out that the esteemed Todd Gale, VE7BPO took down his amazing site, the QRP/SWL Homebuilder. Todd’s site has consistently been one of the best places on the web to get solid, entertaining, well-documented, and hype-free information on the RF circuits that we all love to build. The QRP Homebuilder has been the premier destination on the web for my favorite hobby for as long as I can remember.

Today’s news is about as sad to me as when W7ZOI removed most of his RF experimentation materials as well. I could only hope to be half as talented as either of these two gentlemen, and we are all going to miss this most essential web site. I pray that some day soon we will find a new generation of experimenters who will be able to bring that same evidence-based RF work to the internet.

The good news is that all of that valuable documentation is not lost. Todd has graciously archived the last version of the site as a full-color PDF, with all of the schematics and colorful illustrations that you love. Todd is currently hosting the PDF on his server, but I wanted to mirror it here (with Todd’s permission) in order to ensure that it has wider coverage.

Download the QRP/SWL Homebuilder PDF Archive

I’m not yet at liberty to discuss the circumstances of the decision that I have been told about, but I strongly believe that Todd himself will do that some day. I would like to thank Todd for his years of generous service and for blazing a trail in the RF experimentation community.

Edit: Good news! Todd already has a new site up and running, this time in the form of a blog. It currently only has a test post, but I would bookmark it and put it in your feed reader if I were you. Go forth and visit Popcorn QRP. I’ve added it to the blogroll. Best wishes on the new endeavor, Todd!

Cool Stuff, DX, Ham Culture, Operating

We Make Contact

My last blog post (from two months ago, sorry about that) detailed my participation in the worldwide Hi Juno event; a coordinated effort from amateur radio operators from around the world to send a very slow speed Morse Code signal (HI, to be exact…DIT-DIT-DIT-DIT DIT-DIT) to the Juno spacecraft as it slingshotted around Earth on it’s way out to Jupiter.

After the attempt, the Juno science team promised an update to let us know how the experiment turned out, but was very quiet over the last few months. Worse, was news that Juno had tripped into safe mode during the Earth flyby. There was a decent chance that no usable data from this experiment would be recovered. Suddenly, yesterday on 9 December 2013, there was a press release announcing that there would be a presentation on the results of the Juno Earth flyby, including results from the Hi Juno experiment, and that this presentation would be streamed online. This morning at 10:30 AM, I eagerly connected to the livestream to see what they would announce.

Hi Juno Spectrogram
Hi Juno Spectrogram

In short: we did it! As you can see in the spectrogram above, our signals were detected by the Juno spacecraft in a couple of different time slots. The green dits are the signals that were actually detected by Juno, while the gray ones are anticipated signals which were not detected. One thing is slightly misleading about the spectrogram, as it appears that our actual signals are not depicted in it. I’m not sure why that is, but I imagine it is for clarity in public outreach. Still, as a ham, I would love to see the spectrogram without the overlay of the expected data. One other thing that is interesting is the streaky lines in the upper right-hand corner. It is said that these are terrestrial SW broadcasters.

The Waves instrument primary investigator said that there were at least 1400 hams who participated in the experiment (I assume that is based on the number of QSL requests sent through their email address). If you assume that each was running a barefoot commercial rig (I was, but had it dialed back to 50 W just to go easy on the finals), it’s not hard to imagine that collectively we put around 100 kW of 28 MHz RF out there for a few hours.

Perhaps this stuff is too obscure for the average person to care about, but in my view this is one of the most inspiring and amazing things I’ve done in amateur radio. You can see a bit of my raw reactions from Twitter below:

It’s pretty rare for a space agency to reach out to the public at-large for active participation in a spacecraft science experiment. The fact that we were able to pool together and successfully transmit a signal to space probe whipping around the Earth at very high velocities just boggles my mind. I also have to give a huge huzzah to the team who created the public outreach website for Hi Juno. It was top-notch and did a perfect job in coordinating all of us hams around the world. I hope that the success of the Hi Juno experiment will encourage science teams to consider similar future efforts when possible.

It does seem that the Hi Juno experiment had quite an impact on the science team, as it inspired them to create a short documentary about the event and the results, which you can see below. It’s very well produced and exciting to watch. There is also a shorter video which just shows a depiction of reception of the Hi Juno signal. Now I just need to wait for my Juno QSL to arrive…

UPDATE: Here’s a press release about Hi Juno from the mission page.

Design, Ham Culture, Homebrewing

Homebrewing Hangout

As I mentioned in the previous post, I wanted to try the Google+ Hangouts feature to attempt to do a video chat version of the old EchoLink chat that some of us used to have a few years ago on Saturdays. Today we took it for a spin, and I think I really like how it shaped up. We ended up having a total of 12 participants, with about half of the people actively participating, including AK6L, OK4BX, W0EA, LA3PNA, and WG0AT (Steve the Goathiker).

I’ve never used the G+ Hangouts before, so I didn’t really know what to expect, other than a video chat. It turns out that it’s quite a bit more useful than that. For example, you can do screensharing with your PC desktop or a particular window. Tomas OK4BX came prepared with an excellent slideshow presentation of the DDS-driven MEPT that he and his father recently put on the air. W0EA was able to show us the schematic and PCB layout of the amplifier T/R switch that he just sent out for manufacturing. You are also able to switch between multiple cams while in the Hangout, which AK6L used to give us some nice closeups of his projects. I’ve got a USB microscope which is basically a webcam with a high-power lens, so it would work great for showing off close-ups of things as necessary. We also got a neat treat to a live view of WG0AT’s goats Rooster and Peanut, courtesy of his iPhone connection to the Hangout.

The only potential downside that I could see when compared to EchoLink is the free-for-all format versus the way that EchoLink facilitates traditional roundtables. It wasn’t really a problem for our group, but I was at a bit of a loss on how to handle moderation. In the future, I think we’ll start off with a sign-up queue to speak, then end with a free-form chat. There’s also no native list of callsigns to call upon, but using a Hangout plugin (Lower Third), you can add a caption to your video stream with your name and callsign just like a TV chyron.

The overall impression was that the hangout went better than expected. We had some really interesting information presented and the turnout was excellent for a first time. I think this definitely is superior to the EchoLink chat. Now that I have an idea of what’s going on, it should run even smoother next time. If you are not already a member, go to our Google+ Community page (Ham Radio Homebrewing) and join. The next time there is a Hangout, you’ll get an invitation. We’ve scheduled the next one for two weeks from today due to it being close to Christmas next weekend. I’m not sure if this will continue on a weekly or every other week schedule in the future, but we will continue these Hangouts on a regular schedule.

Ham Culture, Homebrewing

Community

OpenBeaconMini

I recently did quite a bit of pontificating about the diminished state of our online communities. It’s easy enough to complain, but the real measure of devotion is actually taking positive actions to help move things along. In that spirit, I was inspired by the recent announcement of Google+ Communities (a development that’s been sorely needed for a long time) to create a new group there called “Ham Radio Homebrewing“.

The nice thing about G+ Communities is that is supports a better range of communication possibilities than a traditional listserv or forum can provide. Photos, videos, and links to interesting projects can be very easily shared, in an instantly accessible graphical format. G+ also has the “Hangouts” feature, which allows you to video conference with other members of the group. I envision this could be like a souped-up version of the EchoLink QRP chats, where we could show off projects to each other, in live video chat.

I’m also planning on using the Ham Radio Homebrewing group to organize a small group build of a simple Manhattan construction project based on the OpenBeacon MEPT kit. This little project will be called OpenBeaconMini, and will be a very simple QRSS/DFCW QRPp transmitter kit for the frequency of 14.140 MHz (and if the project goes well, a second run of the project for 3.852 MHz). Keep an eye on the Ham Radio Homebrewing group and this blog for further details as this progresses.

Ham Culture, QRP, Sanctimonious Preaching

Inflection Point

Hello there. Yes, there is still life at this blog, although whether it is intelligent is still indeterminate. I feel awfully guilty about the lack of content for the blog in the last year, but I’ve been in a horrible time crunch since getting Etherkit off the ground. When it comes to making the choice between moving your small business forward so you can feed your family or writing a vanity blog post, I’m sure you know which will win pretty much every time. I have no intention for the blog to fade away, so I hope that you all will keep me in the feed reader so that when the time crunch eases up a bit, I can get back to blogging more often and can share some interesting stuff with you.

Anyway, on to the main point. For a fair bit of time now, I’ve had a vague impression that something was going a bit sour in the online QRP/homebrewer community. It never really surfaced consciously all that often, but I distinctly recall there being a general aura of discontent around my feelings about the state of the community. It has dawned on me that even though we have more communication channels available to us than ever before, we are becoming increasingly insular and fragmented, even within our own little sub-hobby. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that this has happened while our choices of online communication channels has exploded.

I’m going to attempt to put some substance to this impression, with the hope that if I’m right about it, that maybe I’ve planted a seed for a way forward in one of my readers. This is probably going to come across as a bit of an Airing of Grievances, but that is not the point of this post at all. I will give you supporting data for my point of view, but I also intend to take a critical look at myself as well, as I’m sure that I’ve also made plenty of my own mistakes.

I believe that I got my first wake-up call a few months ago, when I learned that one of the most esteemed members of our group, Wes W7ZOI was hanging it up on his online amateur radio technical activities. Not only that, but whatever his motivation for withdrawing, it was also strong enough to make him pull all of his previous content off the web. This hit me like a punch in the gut. Wes has always been a most gracious virtual Elmer to many of us out here. He always seemed eager to pass on his enormous breadth of knowedge to those who asked for help. I have no knowledge of what transpired to change his mind about our community. The only public clue seems to be this quotation left behind on what’s left of his technical web page:

I often say that when you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind; it may be the beginning of knowledge, but you have scarcely, in your thoughts, advanced to the stage of science, whatever the matter may be.

Whatever the catalyst was, Wes seems to be leaving us based on some negative experience. I can’t begin to tell you how much this troubles me. People like Wes are an extremely rare treasure in any community, not to mention one as small as ours. I can’t draw any firm conclusions based on the very limited information that we have, but it is not a good statement on the health of our community when such a luminary finds it worthwhile to withdraw, instead of continuing to engage.

The next data point I present is a blog post from John AE5X, published earlier this month. It’s a succinct entry, so I suggest that you click over and read it for yourself. In the case that you don’t, the Cliff’s Notes version of the post is a reflection on the changes in the QRP community in the last decade. Some of the relevant ideas that I’d like to point out are:

QRP-L was alive with real content. People were talking about the latest kit they built and what they were doing with it. The QRP contests and events were well attended, providing further topics for discussion on QRP-L. Norcal 40A’s, SST’s, great rigs from Small Wonder Labs and Oak Hills Research could be heard, worked and talked about.

There was diversity among QRPers too – the hang-a-wire-in-a-tree gang and the QRP DXers all rubbed shoulders on QRP-L. As a result, all QRPers were exposed to various aspects of the 5-watt realm.

and

On the negative side, QRP-L is little more than a small circle of the same dozen people making 90% of the posts that occur there with the real meat of QRP technical discussion taking place on a specific rig’s dedicated YahooGroup. Ditto for the operational aspects of QRP: SOTA and IOTA have their own forums, leaving QRP-L relegated to sharing space in the dusty bins with newsgroups.

and

I am more thankful than I can describe at the exposure I received to ideas, techniques and equipment on the old QRP-L. That doesn’t happen anymore with the real brain power having been sucked away to specific forums.

John hits the nail on the head. I started being active in QRP a bit more a decade ago, right at the same time about which John is writing. And my memory is exactly the same as his. There was an excitement, vitality, and cross-pollination that made QRP-L nearly indispensable to both the QRP operator and the QRP homebrewer. QRP-L was pretty much the only game in town, at least on the online frontier. Today, it’s a pale shadow of its former self. Nothing new is happening. Hardly any new blood is joining (or if they are, they are not speaking up). At least that was my last impression of it, because I rarely even look at it any more. I’m still subscribed to QRP-L (and a handful of other listservs), but I admit that I hardly even open up the Mailing List folder in my mail application any more. The amount of worthwhile content just doesn’t seem worth it any more in exchange for the time spent sifting through the flame wars, pissing contests, and endlessly regurgitated arguments.

I don’t mean to pick on QRP-L, but I think it’s very illustrative of the issues we face. Almost all of the best and brightest has left, for one reason or another. And yes, people have been bemoaning the death of QRP-L for years. I bring it up because I think it’s a leading indicator of the state of our online community. One of the most important statements in John’s post is where he identifies the brain drain to all of the tiny little niche forums in our already-small sub-hobby. The QRP-L exodus happened in earnest years ago, but I think we are now starting to see the second order effects of this phenomena. We have scores of Yahoo Groups, forums, and social networks for our specific little area of interest within QRP or homebrewing or for our favorite rigs or vendors, but we don’t come together under the larger banner of QRP any longer, in any way. I suspect that this gets us a bit locked in to our little corners of the ‘net. I don’t know about you, but I’m finding myself having an increasingly harder time managing all of my different communities of interest. Which tends to make me just throw my hands up and ignore large swathes of those communities at times.

This brings us to the new kid on the block: social media. The big dogs on the block are of course Facebook and Twitter, with smaller networks like Google+ also getting some play in the ham communities. I’ve never used Facebook for a variety of reasons, but I’ve been on Twitter for a few years now and did dabble in Google+ for a bit, so I can speak from experience on those two. The nice thing about the social media networks is that you do break free from that self-imposed ghetto mentioned above. Once you get a well established network, you tend to have connections to all kinds of different hams.

But that blessing can also be a curse. The reason for this is the different expectations that different hams tend to have with each other on these networks. A fair number of people expect that if you have a Twitter account with ham radio as your primary focus, you should only talk about ham radio. Likewise, I found that a number of hams on Google+ did not like it if you posted anything non-ham related to all of your “circles” (“circles” are your self-defined groupings for the people in your network). It’s a fair point of view, but it isn’t the one that I have subscribed to. I am person with different interests and I just don’t have it in me to manage different social media accounts for each of my interests. Nor do I expect others to curate their output to cater to my desires.

The problem is that as much as I try to be tolerant of the diversity of other people’s interests and ideas on the social networks, I’m not always successful. Admittedly, I unfollowed a few dozen Twitter accounts (not all hams, but definitely some) right after the last election due to either incessant gloating or whining. Probably not my finest moment, but I guess election fatigue got to me. On the flip side, while I don’t think I have been a flaming partisan most of the time, I didn’t leave my feed politics-free either. I have no doubt that I have annoyed my share of followers and drove them away due to my politics (especially since I’m a devotee of a political ideal that is not very popular).

My point in bringing this up is not to whine, but to contrast the social networks with the “old-school” communities such as QRP-L and web forums. It seems that you have two different extremes, neither of which lend themselves very well to the type of online QRP community which would be nice to have (at least in my view): knowledgeable, open, free-flowing, fun, and mostly on-topic but not on lockdown.

One other point I’d like to bring up that applies to all of us, regardless of what communication medium we use, is our etiquette. I’m sorry, I’m not trying to be a nanny, I know we’re all grown adults. But I would also bet that the majority of us are on the left side of the bell curve when it comes to emotional intelligence (me included), which means that we are more apt to give and receive offense at times when we should not. For example, in my “career” in the QRP world, I can think of at least three different times when I’ve deeply offended very prominent people in the QRP world. And I can say that each time that I was notified of this offense, I was completely taken by surprise. Without getting into details, I’ve done and said some incredibly boneheaded things. Not because I was trying to troll the QRP stars, but just because I didn’t think through the consequences of my words or actions, or didn’t clearly enough communicate my intentions. Likewise, I’ve been wounded by the words of others, who meant no harm, but I didn’t realize that until later. (We’ll leave aside the issue of the intentional jerk, for whom this essay would mean nothing anyway)

All of this butthurt really damages our relations and breaks down the community, perhaps more than anything else. Again, I’m not trying to be your mommy, but I do ask that you sleep on the stridently-worded rebuttal to the post which offends you, or that you forgive the newbie question that might seem stupid or obvious. I don’t know for certain, but there’s a decent chance that something like this is what caused a number of our best QRPers to leave the online QRP world. Let’s not shoot ourselves in the foot any longer, eh?

If, after I depart this vale, you ever remember me and have thought to please my ghost, forgive some sinner and wink your eye at some homely girl.

—H.L. Mencken

Why have I rambled on for so long about all of this? I’d like to see some of that old magic recaptured. When I designed the Willamette DC transceiver and organized the group build on the now-defunct qrp-l.org listserv, I had one of the best experiences of my ham career. I’d love to do something like that again. But I don’t know where or how. I’m pretty sure that the current QRP-L would not be the place, and definitely not on a web forum like QRZ.com or eHam.com. I have the capacity to host my own forum (I could even stick it under my Etherkit forums), but it would be too insulated, as mentioned above. I have some ideas for some simpler group project builds that I’m itching to get out there, but I’m honestly at a loss of where to present them. I’d love to reach a wide audience of QRPers. Where would that be?

So if you’re still around, you’re probably thinking “wrap it up already!” OK, I appreciate that you had the fortitude to stick around to the end of this diatribe, so I’ll get to the point. I think I’ve outlined an issue that needs to be addressed, but I don’t have a solution. But I think I may know some elements that will be part of the solution. We need some common meeting ground like that has the same “melting pot” formula of the old QRP-L. With the withdrawal of some of our sharpest minds (and the loss of others as silent keys), we seem to be a bit adrift of leadership. The old guard is departing. Not that we need people trying to take charge and give orders. But we do need new thought leaders and innovators; people to inspire by example and by word.

I am quite fond of QRPARCI and all that they do for our community (especially QQ and FDIM), but I think it could also use a bit of a kick in the pants. A rejuvenation effort brought about via ARCI could be very effective, if done correctly. I’d hate to see it get stagnant and not take advantage of the great resource that it has: it’s large number of QRPer members.

Hopefully I’ve given you some serious ideas to chew on, and with any luck, just might inspire one or two of you to make a positive change to help our community. I’m not one who will be any good in trying to rally others to a QRP renewal, but I hope that I can at least reach out to one who is.

Now on a much lighter note, my next blog post will be back to my normal fare! I’ll give you a peek at the little group project idea that I’ve been working on. Who knows, maybe we can get this going somehow.

Ham Culture, Meta, Operating

Last Chance Hammin’

Perhaps that’s a bit melodramatic, but my time for operating and homebrewing is going to be severely curtailed very soon. Baby Boy Milldrum will be arriving any day now (the estimated due date is July 22) and we’re in full-blown panic mode as we finish the last minute preparations to get the baby’s room ready, make sure we have all of the assorted baby stuff that’s needed, and take care of those homeowner chores that need to be done for the summer. So I figured that I should take some free moments to enjoy the hobby while I can. Sometimes I feel like every blog post here should have some really meaty and meaningful content, but perhaps that inhibits me from posting more than a few times a month. So prepare for this post and many of my future posts to cater a bit more to the short attention span crowd. I’ll have to get my ham radio in small doses whenever I can, so expect a bit of ADD to set into the blog for a while.

Anyway, my inbox has been blowing up with DX Sherlock alerts telling me that 6 meters has been open most evenings over the last few weeks. I finally broke down and dug out the Buddipole components on Friday so I could try to snag a few QSOs on 50 MHz. I managed to grab a few SSB QRP QSOs with the FT-817 into VE4 and VE6-land on Friday night using the Buddipole in a simple dipole configuration. The band was in great shape that night, as I could hear a lot of East Coast stations coming in quite strong via multihop Es. On Saturday, I tried to work CW QRP on 50.096 MHz but had zero success even after calling CQ many, many times. The band was open and there was still plenty of activity on the SSB portion of the band, but CW was a bust. Come on CW ops, we’ve got to do better than this.

I still managed to make it a interesting ham radio night. After packing in the gear from the back deck, I went into the shack, flipped on the HF rig, and checked 20 meters (just around sunset local time). Very soon I stumbled upon the legendary Martti, OH2BH calling US West Coast stations. After a quick tune-up, I was able to snag him within about 4 calls. He was absolutely booming into Beaverton (by the sounds of it, he was booming into the entire western portion of the US). This was my first QSO with Martti and was memorable to be sure.

Moving on to a more unpleasant topic, am I the only one who things that most of the ham mailing lists are dying of a creeping mediocrity and groupthink mentality? The big two QRP-Ls are mostly a joke as far as getting an interesting, topical discussion going. On the other hand, start bitching about computers or some other off-topic old fart rant, and you’ll get 30 messages a day. The SKCC group made me sick with its virtual pitchforks-and-torches assault on the new owner of Vibroplex because he had the audacity to replace the stamped brass identification plates with a silkscreened version. The way that a few prominent members of that group (including one who is affiliated with a competing key manufacturer I might add) character assassinated the owner was quite disgusting.

This provides a nice segue into another topic people love to hate: Twitter. I quit tweeting a few months ago due to the large jackass/decent person ratio that I was experiencing. I thought I would miss it quite a bit, but once I got over the DTs in a few days I didn’t really miss it much at all. I still debate whether I should go active on Twitter again, because I see some utility in it; but even when you remove the jerk factor, it still feels like drinking from a firehose most of the time. Not to mention that huge time sink that results from checking your account all of the time make sure you are up-to-the-minute on the latest crap. What to do?

Finally, a plea. Some of you may know of qrpedia.com, which I tried (and failed miserably) to turn into a QRP/homebrewer aggregated blog and knowledge repository. It’s already in sad shape, but with the new kid coming, I know I’ll have no time to devote to it, so I need to let it go. I don’t want to nuke the site because there are a handful of people who put a lot of hard work into posting content there. I would like to sell the site for a nominal price and have it go to someone who could give it another chance. Please contact me if this interests you at all. Prices and terms are very negotiable.

Ham Culture, Operating

Ham Radio Hits Linux Journal

cover189The January 2010 issue of Linux Journal is hitting the newsstands, and this one has the theme of Amateur Radio and Linux. One of the featured articles was written by none other than the local Linux guru, KK7DS. I haven’t purchased the issue yet, but I got a sneak peak at this particular article, and I know that Dan does a nice overview of the ways in which you can integrate Linux into your ham radio activities. There’s also a podcast that the magazine has launched with this issue. The hosts talk about the ham radio stuff, although they are not hams, so they have a bit of a difficult time doing a good job of describing what’s going on with the ham radio stuff. It would have been nice if they would have brought Dan or another ham on as a guest. But it’s worth a listen if you are curious about what’s in the magazine, and it’s only about 20 minutes of program. Check it out if you currently use Linux in your shack or might be interested in doing so.

DX, Ham Culture, Homebrewing

This Is How You Do It

While I occasionally get a bit worried about ham radio having to be dragged kicking and screaming into the 21st century, there are encouraging signs that some hams get it. The two areas in ham radio where this seems most pronounced is in Radiosport and DXing/DXpeditions. Outside of the United States, these aspects of the hobby seem to be doing a decent job of attracting folks under 50 to our nerdy little world (no offense to you crusty old guys; without you our hobby would be non-existent). I’m not quite sure why, but inside of the US, these pursuits haven’t quite had the same pull on the younger crowd. Speaking for myself, I’ve never felt I could seriously tackle either activity without having the ability to deploy a half-decent antenna, something I’ve only recently been able to do because I just purchased my first single-family house. Perhaps other younger folks have had a similar problem.

Anyway, let me show you the efforts of a few people who have helped in blowing a little dust off of our vintage hobby. First up is the website and video blog of XR0Y, the Rapa Nui (Easter Island) DXpedition. These guys have a very visually appealing website with tons of information about the operation, a blog to keep you updated on the latest news, a Twitter feed, and perhaps best of all, a really cool video blog. The production values are top-notch (they are promising HD video of the actual operation) and it’s interesting to get a behind-the-scenes look at a DXpedition from start to finish. Here are the first three videos in the series; it looks like many more are on the way:

Next, a topic a little bit nearer to my heart, courtesy of W2LJ. Larry was contacted by VK1AA regarding a new QRP transmitter kit from GenesisRadio called the Q5. It looks like this kit is geared towards the new kitbuilder/homebrewer, perhaps as something to build on a club “kit night”. The design uses CMOS logic for the LO and driver amp, which feeds into a class-A PA (about 1 watt output). I don’t see any low-pass filtering on the output and there’s no specification on the spurious products, so an outboard filter might be in order.

GenesisRadio got an excellent video spokesman for their kit; young VK2FJDX. Check out the FB job he does in promoting the new kit:

Ham Culture, Meta

Welcome to the Social

A few months ago, I activated Google Analytics on the blog so I could get some idea of my traffic numbers, what search terms land people here, which posts are most popular, and who is sending traffic my way. This tool has been a bit of an eye-opener in multiple ways, but one of the most glaring things I noticed was some incoming links from other blogrolls that I hadn’t seen before. I like to reciprocate these links whenever possible, so I’ve been working on updating my own blogroll when I catch some previously unnoticed traffic coming in on Analytics. I believe it’s important for us ham bloggers (especially in the tiny subculture of homebrewing) to network with each other as much as possible.

To those ends, I’m going to post more often regarding cool content that I’ve found on other blogs (much like the SolderSmoke blog). Analytics has shown me how important this crosslinking is for traffic generation and for building awareness of other blogs. Hopefully it won’t distract much from the original content. Let me know if you think it gets out of balance.

Update

Somebody does read these posts! I’m pleased to see that some other folks agree with me. One nice side effect of this post was that I was able to smoke out a few new blogs to link to. Thanks everyone!