Etherkit, Random Musings

Etherkit Rev B

You may have already seen it, but please allow me to direct your attention to my latest post on the Etherkit blog. For the tl;dr version: sorry to have been quiet on the business front so long, also sorry to have failed to do a good job keeping up on business communications, the OpenBeacon and CRX1 products are being sunsetted (I’ve reduced the price of my limited remaining stock of OpenBeacon to $29), new products and new initiatives are coming in the near future.

I wanted to mention a few more things that I neglected to say in that post. First, I also plan on releasing another revision of the Si5351A Breakout Board for sale as a kit. There are a few bugs to fix on the current version on OSHPark, but it shouldn’t take me too long to get a new revision up there and ready for testing soon. I’ve also reduced the price of EtherProg to only $9, which should make it in line with other similar tools.

To be bluntly honest, it has been a difficult year here on the Etherkit front because of multiple failures, some of which I must keep private for now. However, I have been buoyed by encouragement and help from friends and family, and I plan to redouble my efforts to make Etherkit the company that I envisioned when I founded it.

There will still be quite a bit more to announce in the near future, but now is not quite the time to reveal everything being worked on behind the scenes here. I will have more Etherkit news soon, so as usual, watch this blog for updates.

Thank you!

Etherkit, QRP

CRX1 Group Builds?

I’m pretty happy with the way that the CRX1 turned out, but understandably I haven’t sold a ton of them because 1) they are a SMT kit and 2) the tuning range is a bit limited. However, it’s a stable and sensitive CW receiver and it’s pretty fun to build as well.

There are still PCBs and a fair number of components left to kit another batch of CRX1s, but I would need to order more components in order to complete a 2nd batch of kits. I’d hate to see these parts sitting around, so I have a potential proposal that I’d like to use to gauge interest for ordering those other components.

I believe these would be great as a group build project for those who have built through-hole kits in the past but want to try their hand at SMT. The circuit board is not cramped and the passives are almost all 0805, so they are not too small. So of there are any of you interested in ordering a batch for a group build (whether for a few friends or for a club) then email me at milldrum at gmail dot com. I can arrange for a bulk discount over the current $30 retail price. The discount will be based on the number ordered.

Finally, wanted to show you a very quick demonstration of the receiver to those of you who haven’t seen it in action before. Take a peek at this video to see it listening to 40 meters.

I could probably work out something on the OpenBeacon as well, if you think your group would prefer to do that instead. Just send me an email to the above address.

Etherkit, QRP

The CRX1 Is Here!

I’m happy to report that the CRX1 40 meter receiver kit is now in full production and is available for purchase in the Etherkit Store for $40 (which includes all controls and connectors, you just add some wires and an enclosure). Allow me to quote from the product page:

The CRX1 is a simple VXO-tuned superheterodyne receiver for the 40 meter band, with tuning centered around the popular QRP watering hole frequency of 7.030 MHz. It is entirely constructed from surface mount devices in the easy-to-build 0805 (US) size for passive components and SOT-23 class semiconductors. The PCB is large and single-sided, which provides for uncramped construction and makes the CRX1 an ideal warm-up kit for the CC1 QRP transceiver (coming soon). The CRX1 is not just meant to be a novelty to be tossed aside after construction. All of the support circuitry for muting, T/R, and sidetone is included, so it can be paired with virtually any transmitter which uses grounded keying. There is also a port for an external VFO to enable further user experimentation.

All controls and connectors are included with this kit, so you just need to supply an enclosure and a few knobs to finish the job!

Specifications

Frequency Range: Approximately 7.030 to 7.034 MHz (at +13.7 VDC power supply)
IF Bandwidth: Approximately 400 Hz
Current Consumption: 25 mA (at +13.7 VDC power supply)
Power supply: +9 VDC to +14 VDC
MDS: -123 dBm
3rd Order IMD DR: 84 dB
IF Rejection: 74 dB
Image Rejection: 67 dB
PCB dimensions: 70 mm x 100 mm
Antenna Connector: BNC
DC Power Connector: 2.1 mm barrel jack
Phone Jack: 3.5 mm stereo
Key Jack: 3.5 mm stereo
Reverse polarity protection
Muting, sidetone (user enabled), T/R switch, external VFO port included

Available Bands

40 Meters – 7.030 to 7.034 MHz

The CRX1 is a fun little receiver to build and is a great kit to get your feet wet with SMT construction!

On a side note, I’ve established an IRC server on my Raspberry Pi for Etherkit and it has been working great for the last month or so. Please do stop by for tech talk (and other occasional diversions) on channel #etherkit at irc.recursiv.com.

Etherkit

CRX1 Open Beta

CRX1 Beta
CRX1 Beta

If you don’t follow me on Twitter, you may not have heard that I have been working on a little “warm-up” kit in preparation for the CC1 release. Called the CRX1, this kit is a little VXO-tuned superhet receiver based on my 2010 FDIM Challenge entry, the Clackamas. The CC1 is also a descendant of that project, so you could say that the CC1 and CRX1 are siblings.

The CRX1 is an all-SMT project. The passives are size 0805 and the transistors are SOT-23, so it should be able to be built by most kit builders with the aid of a bit of lighted magnification. All of the components are on a single side of the PCB and things are not very cramped, so it should be a pretty easy build for an experienced kit builder, and within the capability of even a newer kit builder with a few kits under his belt. Here are the key specifications for the receiver:

Specifications

Frequency Range: Approximately 7.030 to 7.034 MHz (at +13.7 VDC power supply)
IF Bandwidth: Approximately 400 Hz
Current Consumption: 25 mA (at +13.7 VDC power supply)
Power supply: +9 VDC to +14 VDC
MDS: -123 dBm
3rd Order IMD DR: 84 dB
IF Rejection: 74 dB
Image Rejection: 67 dB
PCB dimensions: 70 mm x 100 mm
Antenna Connector: BNC
DC Power Connector: 2.1 mm barrel jack
Phone Jack: 3.5 mm stereo
Key Jack: 3.5 mm stereo
Muting, sidetone (user enabled), T/R switch, external VFO port included

I’m now to the point where I have a small number of beta test kits available, but instead of picking beta testers, I would like to try something different. So this time I’m going to try an “open beta”. The product is simple enough that I don’t think it will need much in the way of help in going from a beta to production. Therefore, I’m going to open sales up to everyone. The documentation is currently in a basic form, although I’m going to expand it quite a bit before it goes into production. Because of the basic documentation, I would like to ask that only confident builders purchase a kit at this point. It will be more suitable for novice builders in the near future when full production commences. You can check out the documentation here if you want to get a feel for what state it is currently in.

The beta kits will sell for $29 plus shipping, although that price will rise a bit at production. You can see the product page and purchase one on the Etherkit store, but hurry, since there are only eight beta kits available!

Etherkit, Homebrewing, Random Musings, Wideband Transmission

Wideband Transmission #2

CC1 Beta Kit For Sale

I ended up having one leftover kit from the CC1 beta test and I thought that an experience builder might like to build it. There are a few minor mods to perform to the PCB, so it’s best suited for someone who feels comfortable with that. The (hopefully) final PCB spin is coming soon and will be slightly different, but this version works well, as AA7EE can attest to. I can offer the kit for a discount over the final CC1 retail price, and it’s currently available for 20 or 40 meters (although the final retail product will be available for more bands). Contact me at milldrum at gmail dot com if you are interested.

SOTA 12 Meter Challenge

I’m not subscribed to the SOTA reflector, but I saw a post on the VK3ZPF blog that there was an announcement on the reflector that there will be a SOTA 12 Meter Challenge. I think this is a great idea and I want to support it if I can. I haven’t made too many 12 meter QSOs, but when I have it seems like the DX has been pretty easy picking. When it’s open, the band seems quiet and the signals sound great. The plus for SOTA activation is that a resonant antenna is small and easy to pack.

My original plans for the CC1 were to only support up to 15 meters, but I think I may add 12 meters in order to support this initiative. The DDS in the CC1 is clocked at 50 MHz, so technically I should be able to output a 24.9 MHz signal, although I don’t know in practice how well this works at a frequency so close 0.5 Fc. If I can get it to work, I will release it as an available band on the CC1.

New PCBs Are Here!

CRX1 Beta
CRX1 Beta

Here is the latest beta PCB from the Etherkit, the CRX1 receiver! It is all-SMT construction, but I spread out the components a bit more than the CC1 and all of the parts are on one side of the PCB only. It’s VXO-tuned for the 40 meter band (a few kilohertz around 7.030 MHz) and is based on the Clackamas transceiver which I entered into the 2010 FDIM Challenge (which means it’s also a cousin of the CC1). This receiver has only discrete components (size 0805 resistors/caps, SOT-23 transistors), so it should be fairly easy to build. In other words, a good warm-up for the CC1. It also has a port for an external VFO, so it will be a platform for experimentation as well.

I’ll build this PCB up today and verify that it works, then get a few beta testers to confirm that all is well. Hopefully I can get this product onto market fairly quickly, with a low price. Stay tuned for more details as work progresses.

More Stuff For Sale!

I’ve added some new gear to my For Sale page that would be a great addition to the bench of any homebrewer. Please stop by and take a look!