Empyrean, Etherkit, Meta

The Road Forward

Per my last blog post, I’ve completely deleted my Patreon account. Those days are over and are not coming back. I’m still not sure what will replace it, or if anything will. It is already difficult for me to ask for money in return for mostly intangible benefits. Losing the Patreon monthly income will hurt a bit, as that was the funds I was using to pay for OpenBeacon Mini (and other project) development. I only sell a modest amount of the Si5351A Breakout Boards via Etherkit; basically just enough to pay for keeping the lights on there for now.

So allow me to start using this blog again for what I was doing on Patreon, sans the locked content.

OpenBeacon Mini has a schematic finished and I’m just about ready to lay out the PCB. Empyrean (my Arduino Zero derivative) testing is going to be delayed a bit while I figure out how to fund the beta batch. Those two projects are going to be my main focus and I hope to be going into release with both of them by Q1 2018. Further down the line, I don’t want to speculate too much, but I’ll probably tidy up and finish some half-finished smaller boards that I want to add to my Etherkit lineup in order to fill out the catalog with some more RF products.

I’ll work on ramping up the blogging here, using my own site much as I was using Patreon: to post smaller updates about project progress. I always felt the need to make more substantial posts here, which often deterred me from writing. I believe that was a mistake. Expect to see more content in line with microblogging here in the future. Thanks for hanging in there.

Arduino, Coding, Microcontrollers

Arduino C++ Investigations – Introduction

As mentioned in the last Wideband Transmission, I recently viewed a presentation from CppCon 2016 which convinced me that a lot of my preconceived notions about the (lack of) suitability of C++ for use in microcontroller applications might be misplaced.

The standard lore (go ask Wes Hayward W7ZOI his opinion of lore) states that C++ is inefficient in generating the compact binaries that are required when using a device with very limited program storage and RAM space, as you will find with microcontrollers (especially 8-bit controllers). Given that C is a probably fairly categorized as a mid-level language, and that C++ easily falls into the high-level language category with its much larger feature set, it seems natural to believe that there has to be an overhead cost to pay when using C++ over C. Yet, if you take the time to watch that video, you can see that it is possible to use advanced features of C++ and incur little to no overhead in the binary.

Not to say that you can just blithely use C++ without the possibility of incurring an overhead penalty. I’ve tried it and had some horrible results, and chalked my experience up to the old lore being correct as a general case. But that’s obviously not true.

Goals

What I intend to do with this series is to look into ways that the features of C++ (mostly C++11 at this point) can be leveraged in the Arduino environment to take advantage of the advanced features of the language (and perhaps even things such as the Standard Template Library) while incurring no or perhaps a very small penalty in flash and RAM usage.

As most of you are probably aware, Arduino is based on C++, and every Arduino library coder has to use at least minimal C++ functionality in order to create a library. However, in the name of abstracting away much complexity, Arduino sketches are written more in C-style than modern C++. That being the default case, there’s no reason we can’t incorporate more C++ coding techniques into our Arduino sketches, as long as doing so serves our purposes of being able to use the higher-level abstractions without paying a penalty.

Before seeing the above presentation, I had already been thinking about this topic because good old Hackaday has been running a series of articles about it. While I may cover some areas previously addressed by said articles, I notice that many (but not all) of the previously mentioned posts don’t delve into making the measurements of how implementing the C++ coding patterns affect code and RAM size (or perhaps execution speed). Data is king, so I intend to provide as much of it as possible so that you can see actual proof of the effects of migrating to C++ coding.

Just so you know where I’m coming from, let me tell you about where I’m at in my journey as a coder. I’ve been writing C for microcontrollers for a fair bit of time now, and I think I’m at least proficient at it, but not an expert by any means. I’ve dabbled in C++, but never really written any major programs in it, so I’m on a learning journey here as well. I’m sure I probably won’t do everything perfectly or the most efficiently, but by holding to what the data tells me, I think I can provide some useful information to all while I learn some new things for myself.

Areas of Investigation

At this point, I don’t have a list of topics for this series that is set in stone. I do have some initial ideas for investigation, but plan to follow other leads as they present themselves and as I learn more about this topic. From my initial notes, here are some potential topics you may see in future posts:

  • Using constexpr
  • C++ Standard Library and Standard Template Library usage
  • Using lambda functions/inline functions
  • Variable declaration: auto vs explicit
  • Other C++11 features, such as the new for loop syntax that functions as a foreach

Please feel free to comment below if you have some other topics of potential interest.

Tools

In order to maintain consistency across the series, I intend to use the same microcontroller platform in all articles. The controller of choice will be my Empyrean Alpha board, which is basically an Arduino Zero minus the debugging circuitry on a form factor that can be plugged into a solderless breadboard, just like the Arduino Nano and related products. The Empyrean Alpha uses an Atmel ATSAMD21G18A microcontroller, which runs with a 48 MHz clock speed and has 256 kB of flash program memory and 32 kB of RAM, which is ample for many types of projects.

Hopefully in the near future, I’ll be selling the Empyrean Alpha and its little brother Beta through Etherkit, so stay tuned for further news on that.

The Arduino environment for ATSAMD microcontrollers uses the arm-none-eabi-gcc toolchain, which has a variety of very nice tools that are available in addition to the compiler. One of those is arm-none-eabi-size, which can give a breakdown of the flash and RAM usage of a sketch simply by feeding it the file name of the ELF file that the compiler generates. For example:

jason@oberon /tmp/arduino_build_994621 $ arm-none-eabi-size -B foreach_test.ino.elf
   text    data     bss     dec     hex filename
   9732     256    1780   11768    2df8 foreach_test.ino.elf

From the above, you can see the text section, which indicates size of the program in flash memory, the data section, which is the initialized variable storage in RAM, and the bss section, which is allocated but uninitialized variable storage in RAM. Pretty easy to use and interpret. We’ll talk about this tool a bit more in the first investigation so that we have a good understanding about it.

Most likely, I’ll also be using the Compiler Explorer tool, as was used in the video above. It looks like a very handy way to quickly and roughly demonstrate how code changes affect the assembler output from the compiler.

Onward

Now that we have the preliminaries out of the way, I’m ready to start tackling this series. Watch this blog for the first installation, which will be coming soon. My patrons will have early draft access to articles in the series, and will have a chance to chime in there with suggestions to help me with the final article on nt7s.com. See you soon!

Etherkit, Microcontrollers

Market Research

It has been awfully quiet on the public front here for sure, but I have been working on quite a bit of things behind the scenes here at Etherkit Galactic HQ. It’s been a challenging year since I last wrote about the personal things going on here, but things have been going reasonable well after a rough half-year immediately following that post. I’m just about ready to attempt to revamp Etherkit, however there are still a few challenging roadblocks to overcome, and I could use a bit of guidance.

The most difficult issue is trying to re-bootstrap the business financially. I’m currently only selling the Si5351A Breakout Board, which obviously isn’t enough to expand a business upon. The possibility of a capital infusion unfortunately broke down, and so the only practical way forward at this point is most likely another crowdfunding campaign.

As mentioned in the opening paragraph, I have been working on various projects, and so I do have some candidates. Many of the projects that are in the works or only even in the planning stages require the use of a microcontroller, and so last year I decided to make my own Arduino-compatible microcontroller board family which I can then use as the heart of many of these products. I’ve taken a real liking to the Arduino Zero because of its speed and features, but the cost is fairly high and the standard Arduino form factor isn’t great for many purposes. Therefore, I have decided to make a new standalone board derived from the Zero which I call Empyrean, and you can see in the photo at the top of the post. It comes in two flavors: Alpha and Beta. The Alpha is based on the Atmel ATSAMD21G18A microcontroller, same as the Arduino Zero. The Beta uses a controller (ATSAMD21G16B) with a bit less flash and RAM than the Zero (but still more than an Arduino Uno), but is also priced similarly to the ATmega328 line of microcontrollers. Both come on a small board similar in size to the Nano and has nearly all of the same circuitry of the Arduino Zero except for the EDBG support.

It is true that there are a flood of Arduino clones out there and this makes entering the market with another one somewhat crazy. My value proposition for Empyrean is based on the confluence of breadboard-friendly form factor along with a wallet-friendly price. My target price point is around $15 for Alpha and $10 for Beta. While that is a fair bit more than your typical eBay Nano clone, Empyrean would also be quite a bit more powerful than a Nano, in both clock speed and available memory. So my question to you, dear reader, is whether you would be interested enough in this product to back a crowdfunding campaign in order to have it made? I do plan to make a serious push on a radio soon, but it would be nice to ramp up the business before that, while also solidifying the microcontroller platform that will be used in future products. Let me know what you think in the comments, or send me an email.

In the mean time, I thought I’d let you know that I’m working on a Rev D board spin of the Si5351A Breakout Board. You can see a prototype in beautiful OSHPark purple above. The most significant changes in this revision will be to change the coupling of the reference oscillator to the Si5351 XA input pin to meet datasheet specs and to panelize the board in preparation for future pick-and-place operations (they are currently hand-assembled!).

Perhaps even more interesting is that I also hope to be able to soon offer a frequency calibration report with every board sold. Thanks to LA3PNA, I am now in possession of a decent 10 MHz GPSDO to use as a lab reference, which will allow me to measure the frequency correction value accurately enough for hobbyist usage. I now have a small printer on hand, and so now what I need to do is add new code to my board test script to measure the correction value and print it for inclusion with each board sold. Stay tuned for notification when I’m ready to go live with this; hopefully soon.

Let me reiterate: I’d love to hear your thoughts about the above proposals. I’m interested in serving the needs of my customers. Thank you!